Blog

How Christians (Should) Learn from the Past

It was George Santayana (1863 – 1952), the Spanish born philosopher, poet, and novelist, who famously said, “Those who cannot remember the past are condemned to repeat it.” I have yet to meet someone who disagrees with Santayana’s dictum. But, we might ask, what is required of one who desires to learn from the past? This[…]

Read More

Why Do People Become Catholic? A Response to R.R. Reno

R.R. Reno, Editor of FIRST THINGS, recently wrote an insightful article on reasons why people are drawn to the Catholic Church. I always enjoy reading Reno, particularly his cultural analysis. And since this subject is in my bailiwick, I read his observations with great interest. Here is how Reno introduces his post: My Protestant friends[…]

Read More

Catholic Believers as Brothers and Sisters in Christ

A reader posed the following question to me: Chris, how can you clearly articulate some of the significant differences in doctrine between evangelical Protestants and Roman Catholics and yet continue to call Catholic believers “brothers and sisters in Christ”? For many of the Reformers, the doctrinal differences led to quite different conclusions about where Roman[…]

Read More

Is Religious Dialogue with Catholics Desirable?

To many evangelical Protestants the word “dialogue” is akin to the word “ecumenism,” which, in their lexicon, is another way of saying “theological compromise.” These individuals fear that such discussion is simply a prelude to suppressing genuine differences in a lowest-common-denominator approach to unity. In fact, over the years I have noticed a fascinating phenomenon[…]

Read More

Reaching Catholics in Your Community

Determining whether your community is predominantly Catholic was once fairly simple. You’d see multiple parishes with names like “Saint Petronille” and “Holy Family.” Your local hardware would sell Saint Joseph statues (burying St. Joe upside-down in the yard is thought to help the process of selling a house). You’d notice ashen foreheads during Lent and[…]

Read More

Justification among Catholics and Protestants

This Sunday morning at NCC we will have a Q&A session in the fellowship hall following the morning service in which we consider how to talk with Catholic friends about the gospel (with copies of my new book on the subject for sale at a discounted price). In the interest of priming the pump, here[…]

Read More

When Catholics Visit Your Church…

Whenever I speak at churches on the topic of talking with Catholics about the gospel, there is a particular question that normally emerges: How can Protestant churches engage Catholics (and former Catholics) on Sunday morning? It’s a difficult question to answer, since we seldom think of Catholics as a people group who possess a distinct culture. And[…]

Read More

Perspective on the Number of Converts to Catholicism in the U.S.

Conversion from Protestantism to Roman Catholicism has received attention over recent years, partly on account of autobiographies that describe the movement. For example, in 1993, a Presbyterian graduate of Gordon-Conwell, Scott Hahn, published Rome Sweet Home: Our Journey to Catholicism. In 1994, Professor Thomas Howard wrote his story, Lead, Kindly Light: My Journey to Rome.[…]

Read More

“Blind Spots” by Collin Hansen

Last month, at our New Covenant Community Chat, we considered Collin Hansen’s new book Blind Spots as a way to reflect upon our doctrinal, missional, and service-oriented commitments. Following up from that conversation, I would like to offer the following insights by Ed Stetzer on Collin’s book (in Christianity Today), which help us to boldly love each other and unite[…]

Read More

Dual Level Preaching

It was one of the best pieces of advice I have ever received. Following an exposition of Matthew 2 in which I explained the typological significance of Jesus’ flight to Egypt against the background of salvation history, an older member of the congregation put his arm around me and asked if he could offer some[…]

Read More